CNN: Internet Start-Ups going low-budget

CNN recently posted a story on their site about how Internet start-ups are picking up where they left off after the bubble burst in early 2000. It starts to compare the differences in how life was for tech companies back in the day versus what tech companies are doing differently in 2007. The article states this difference:

While their Internet bubble predecessors dreamed of stock offerings, spoke blithely about burn rate and talked about selling everything online, these startups are focusing on interactivity, services for mobile gadgets and getting bought by a bigger company.

This is pretty true and you can see how applicable it is with all the recent start-ups, with a lot being social networking-type sites and employ the whole Web 2.0 schema. As the stock options started to rise, the point back in the day was to get rich quickly and hope the ride never stops. But now, it’s definitely more about how to get their content on mobile phones, allow people to instantly receive their information through wi-fi devices, merging all portable devices into one to allow for streamlined usage, etc.

The article continues to talk about how all things relating to Internet start-ups have become really low-budget – not only with the less overhead (since most things can be managed easily with an Internet company in the beginning stages), but financially speaking, it can be quite tiresome and somewhat difficult to manage. Since everything is virtual and can be executed practically seemlessly, the things behind the scenes can often be the complete opposite and these Internet start-ups still require some good faith venture capitalists to join in the process and foster this technology to help it grow and hopefully get the Internet industry back on its feet and to the point where the tech world was before the bubble burst.