Your online business just got more personal(ized)…

Personalizedwebcopy.com has found an interesting way to personalize the dreaded sales letter. No more will your online sales letters be shunned by your prospective customers who just see a plain letter addressed to practically ever Jack and Jill. The days of traditional sales letter are over and everyone seems interested in finding a new way to attract potential sales.

If you’ve ever dealt in direct marketing, you’ll know that the key is to make your message more personal to show the consumer that you’re actually interested in reaching them as individuals. In actuality, the thing is that there is already methods that you can take to make your online sales letter more personal. If you take all your contacts, put it into a database, and create an e-mail blast with whatever software you use, then certain programs, software, applications will be able to pull out the specified fields and create a personalized e-mail.

This definitely only applies to mass distribution of your online sales letter. But then what’s so fancy about what PersonalizedWebCopy.com is offering? Well in my opinion, actually nothing. From just reading an article about it, the only defining thing is that it will translate your sales letter from type to look like something handwritten. Does it honestly make THAT much difference? Creator Jack Born of Personalized Web Copy claims that there is a difference because of that name recognition. But being handwritten? It just makes it seem more interesting and unique. Plus apparently while there is no software to download and you can do it all online, perhaps you might find it useful.

Until there is a more simplier way, then you might want to stick to traditional sales letters that have more flexibility in being personalized. Either that, or send multiple e-mails but with some form of personalization. Either way, sales is still something to figure out.

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."