Study: Online Videos Don’t Get The Job Done

So I paraphrased the subject line that I found on AdWeek’s website. The real subject line reads “Online Video Fails to Satisfy, Study Says”. I still think mine may be more hilarious…

Nevertheless, in an August 29 article in AdWeek, Prophis eResearch conducted a study and found that 46% of those surveyed said that they viewed online videos, which equates to 67 million online adults. However, broken down further, it turned out that only 22% of the 46% who viewed online videos said that they were “completely satisfied” with the quality and presentation of the videos while nearly “one in five express dissatisfaction”.

The article goes further to breakdown some additional reasons why there was dissatisfaction, but when you look at it, the main reasons is the quality and sound that is at fault. Although what’s interesting is whether they realize that these professional quality videos, not from YouTube, are weighing the fact that they need to display between 30 minutes to an hour worth of video, but manage to make the file size small enough so that those with broadband connection won’t need to wait an enormous amount of time just to watch an episode of “The Office”.

Who knows if this dissatisfaction includes amateur videos from YouTube or Google Video, but if it does, then viewers who are unhappy about the quality of these amateur videos should realize that it is just that…AMATEUR’ish! Those videos are taken just with a regular video camera and then uploaded. They don’t have the entire Pixar studio behind them to make it all glamorous or anything.

What does this survey prove? Practically nothing, but it’s nice to know that there is some unhappiness with online videos. Unfortunately you can’t have your cake and eat it too. You either sacrifice the quality and sound or settle for waiting HOURS for the video to load.

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."