Microsoft Buying Facebook? Not Quite Yet…

In today’s news, it was reported by the Associated Press that software giant, Microsoft would buy a minority stake in Facebook. Already rebuking a $1 billion offer by Yahoo! in 2006, the CEO of Facebook has repeatedly claimed that he wants his site to remain independent and not go the way of Myspace or YouTube.

Funny how no one is talking about buying Friendster

Well the article talks about how Microsoft won’t be spending the big bucks on buying the entire kit-n-kaboodle, but rather will be investing in the site’s success, which means that it will enact some sort of influence on what the site does IF it does become official. Just how much money is Microsoft willing to spend to get its hands on a social media site? According to the AP, probably around $300-500 million dollars.

It appears that Microsoft is eager to get into the social media showdown ever since it’s been dragging its heels over getting the latest acquisitions. First it snapped up Aquantive and now it’s going after Facebook…not a bad setup. Coincidentally, Microsoft already has a deal with Facebook in which they’re serving the social networking site’s ads. With the three major search engine-type companies out there going after the big sites, who’s left?

*a-hem* there’s always Friendster? C’mon…why won’t anyone buy Friendster?

Well if it isn’t Friendster, will the next greatest thing come from Google or Yahoo? These two companies are apparently in the works to develop their own social networking site…with Yahoo’s being called “Mash” and Google’s project still being rumoured to take place.

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."