Offering my two-cents on the Twitter-Seesmic war

Okay, so there’s not a war between Twitter and Seesmic. In fact, everything is quite cordial…no problems whatsoever. So why did I call it a war? Well I thought it would spark some interest in this posting.

Richard Scoble recently posted a Seesmic video in which he explains why he finds Seesmic better than Twitter. His reasoning: it’s easier to feed his adorable baby and post versus feeding and typing. Of course this makes perfect sense, but aside from this one observation, is there anything else that supports why Seesmic is “better” than Twitter? I think it’s more of your own personal preference.

A lot of folks do not have the capability to support a lot of these features. In fact, some people may only be able to sign up for Twitter because they can do it online – I don’t have a data plan with my cell phone…therefore I am unable to Twitter real-time, sadly, nor am I able to post Seesmic video real time like some other folks do. So there are some people who think one application is better than the other because of technical/financial constraints.

However, barring technical/financial constraints and more conceptual issues that lead someone to choose one over the other, I’m not exactly sure. I think Scoble was onto something when he candidly said that Seesmic was better for him because he could multi-task easier than with Twitter. So I suppose it’s a matter of convenience at any specific point of time that you might be in. You could be driving down the road and obviously you don’t want to be Twittering and taking your eyes off the road, but you may (and I am not advocating you doing this) be able to record a video of your info. Or, you could record a video of your journey through a new town/city. On the contrary, you could Twitter more privately than Seesmic…especially if you’re in the theatre, at a meeting, or at a concert. Like I said…it’s more of a convenience factor.

What do you think is easier? What side are YOU on?

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."