Do you trust people online like you would offline?

I’ve been ranting on this blog about how you should be authentic when you interact with people online either via email, blogs, websites, or any other web means. Quite recently, I received an epiphany about being authentic. Currently while in-between jobs, I’ve gone through several recruiters (which will remain nameless for the sake of this post) and while I have had some pretty good success with past recruitment agencies, this time was a little different. I have also been solicited by other recruiters to submit my resume, but there are times when you feel that they would not be the best fit nor would they have your best interest in mind.

Recently I began to follow a guy with the alias @RickM on Twitter and to my surprise he wound up being the CEO of a recruitment/job board specializing in marketing and advertising called TalentZoo. I’m not saying that you need to be on Twitter or social media to validate your company’s existence, but it would help to offer some legitimacy in having people seek out your services. Let’s just say that I felt a little bit more comfortable and reassured knowing that the CEO of a recruitment company was following my tweets on Twitter and knew that if there were any questions, that I could send him a message and it would at least be read by him in a timely manner.

Like I’ve said before and like it’s been written about in other blogs and articles, many companies are starting to get on board. If you find that people are doubting the credibility of your service, perhaps you might consider going on sites like Twitter, Facebook, or blogs and reach out and let them know that there are human beings behind the company and it’s not just a scam. People always enjoy some evidence of legitimacy and it will help them feel more comfortable about joining and giving you some information in return for your services.

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."