How The Pogoplug Saved My Digital Life

Every once in a while I’m glad that things happened the way that they did – even during times of crises. This time, my life could have really went down the toilet if it weren’t for the fact that I had one gadget that I have: a Pogoplug.

What exactly is a Pogoplug? As clear as I can explain it, it’s a device that you can use to put your data easily into the cloud – just take whatever storage device you have, whether it’s a hard drive, thumb drive, or USB device and plug it into the Pogoplug and you can share the data across the ‘net to your friends, co-workers, business clients, etc.  I recently got this just about a month ago and used it to share a thumb drive with my co-workers. And then, trouble hit me.

It was on a Sunday evening when I was working on my desktop computer when all of a sudden my computer crashed. It was a hardware issue – something had malfunctioned…something about a SM Bios. I got really scared because this had happened to me before, but with my external hard drive and I was petrified about losing all my data, including my photos, documents and music. Sadly I managed to escape that ordeal with a majority of my data but there was some things I could not recover. Now this most recent example caused me to reminisce about that and after sourcing my problem on Twitter, I discovered that my hardware failure was probably due to RAM or my motherboard – two things of minor consequence to me. My internal hard drive on my computer was the most important because it had contained my tax information – of which I needed to send to my accountant in the next few days. Fortunately I took my computer to the Best Buy Geek Squad for them to diagnose – fortunately because they could help diagnose, but not sure if I’d go back to them again – and they said I could take my internal hard drive home with me. All that I’d need to do is to buy an enclosure or an adapter to transfer my data.

The next day I bought an enclosure and set it up. The one thing I wanted to do was to take the data from my internal hard drive and access it while transferring it to an external one, but in order to do that, I’d need to plug it into my laptop to be the facilitator – probably causing me some trouble. So instead, I decided that I needed the data now and plugged my hard drive into the Pogoplug and began to transfer data off of the internal drive. And thanks to using Pogoplug’s new desktop application, I’m able to use a “Windows Explorer-like” feature to easily drag and drop files from my internal drive to an external one.

Having your data placed automatically in the cloud can be a really great thing for certain occasions, like transferring large files from your hard drive straight to your partners for review or publishing or sharing of other documents, files & programs across the web in a secure manner. I have a lot of computers and one of the things that I find myself concerned with is versioning and whether one computer has a latest version of the file or is it on another version. Now with the Pogoplug, I can easily remedy this issue by simply using a regular hard drive but now online. Think of it as a large scale Google Docs system that can easily be controlled by you and not a third-party. In terms of security, you can also get very granular on what files you want to share – and tailor what each person can see, edit and download.

Another bonus? The Pogoplug also has a mobile component so you can also manage data from your drive to and from your mobile device – just how cool is that?!?

Check out more about the Pogoplug on their site here.

Disclosure: Should mention that Pogoplug is a client of mine at Stage Two, but I haven’t been compensated or ordered to write this post.

By Ken Yeung

Ken Yeung is a journalist fascinated with the stories of the tech industry and internet culture. He's currently the Technology Editor at Flipboard, where he observes what's happening in the space while also identifying new topics of interest. In addition, he co-hosts the weekly internet show "The Created Economy," which focuses on what's happening to creators and influencers. Previously, he was a reporter for VentureBeat and The Next Web, covering tech startups, the industry's innovations and funding. Ken also has a newsletter you should also subscribe to called "Filed."